Nurture Integrative Health

2020 was one hell of a year, wasn’t it? The ‘virus’… lockdowns… protests… wildfires! …and loss. Some minutes it felt like nothing happened and a few minutes later, so much did. Sure, some of it was not fun, bad even. And others were well–good.

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In my case, there was a big mix of both. 

Three months into the lockdown, my ceiling caved in on me. Literally, I woke up to about 2 and a half feet of plaster just hanging off the ceiling in my apartment. My landlord told me it would take weeks to fix because of Covid restrictions. But they had no other apartments to move me to. I had to choose, live in the mess of moldy plaster or leave. I left. After a few months of staying with friends, I found a roommate situation that felt pretty good. It turned out not to be. When the fires and smoke surrounded Portland, I decided it was best for my health and sanity to go stay with my family in Colorado Springs.

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Three months into the lockdown,

Literally, I woke up to about 2 and a half feet of plaster just hanging off the ceiling in my apartment. My landlord told me it would take weeks to fix because of Covid restrictions. But they had no other apartments to move me to. I had to choose, live in the mess of moldy plaster or leave. I left. After a few months of staying with friends, I found a roommate situation that felt pretty good. It turned out not to be. When the fires and smoke surrounded Portland, I decided it was best for my health and sanity to go stay with my family in Colorado Springs.

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The idea of leaving your chosen home to return to your childhood home for an extended period was all well and good.

I could save some money, I told myself. I’ll have time to focus on developing my Naturopathic private practice more deeply and get some well-needed rest. Although it was not always a bed of roses. Yes, it was hard to return to the nest once I’d flown the coop. I’m grateful for the space and support the decision and my Mom gave me. I healed and recharged my batteries, developed the focus and passion of my Naturopathic practice, and yeah, okay—saved a little money. After 3 months, I was more than ready to return home to Portland.

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For the past 7 months, I have not had a physical home of my own.

 I was truly in transition from place to place, healing my body, in developing my work and professional purpose in the world. Every single corner of my life was transitioning. Much like our world, social and political structures and economy, and our day-to-day lives, we are all in transition. Our old normal has been broken down and a new normal is growing from it. 

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For me, I’m happy to say hand on heart, I am building my new normal.

I have a home. Yes, a physical home, I just signed a lease on a lovely apartment that sits on the edge of a forest. I’m in the city I’ve chosen to be my home, with a loving and supportive community around me. I’ve found a home for my work at MediPro Holistic Health where I am supporting patients in-person to heal many conditions including traumatic brain injuries and establish the most important aspects of home, safety, security, and connections with themselves and their bodies. 

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I feel as though we’ve all been on a hero or heroine’s journey this year.

Literally, for me, the drive from Colorado to Portland through the mountains in the wind, rain, and an ice storm tested my metal for sure. As in an authentic hero’s journey, I’ve arrived back in my home village stronger, wiser, and ready to share my strength and wisdom with my tribe. I hope you see the path forward in your journey. There will be challenges ahead, we’re not at the end yet. But we are all on our own journey home now.

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One of the most exciting things about coming home to Portland

other than the wood-burning fireplace in my apartment, is my new role at MediPro Holistic Health where I work with patients to build healthy brain supportive lifestyles and treat patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries, (TBI).

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Our brains are our life. 

I was first introduced to the magnitude of TBI as a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) in 2010. While working with high school athletes, I witnessed firsthand how a concussion event can impact a person’s entire life. I had one particular athlete who, after his second concussion in 2 years, consistently got lost on campus.

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Imagine that for a moment, a young 17-year-old man experiencing Alzheimer like symptoms including not knowing where he was on the campus he’d worked and live on for the past 3 years.

Watching this boy and more youth athletes like him lose his connections to the cognitive abilities that allow for independent adult lives. During that time I knew that I’d found my medical calling, to help young athletes, military, and people that have been impacted by head injuries to recover their quality of life. Our brains are our life. 

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I help my patients understand that everything in their world generally impacts the brain. Supporting our brain health improves the quality of life and vitality. It is important to learn how to prevent, manage, and treat conditions that affect the brain. I’m here to help with that. 

Continue to follow me on my blog, Facebook, Instagram, or LinkedIn for more information about my approaches to brain injuries and brain health.

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